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Music Theory

Music theory is a set of principles used to analyze the construction and perception of music and to compose music. These skills are enhanced by the study of Musicianship, the ability to hear music internally (audiate) and score music that is heard (dictate).

This course presents the principles of tonality and harmonic function—the tendency of certain types of music to progress toward a central tone or key. Topics will include a stylistic survey of music history, concepts in the sociological and psychological foundations of music, a review of the fundamentals of music, melodic construction, two-part counterpoint, harmonic progression, phrase structure and harmonization. Further application of these topics will be addressed in the corresponding musicianship course. Thus, concurrent enrollment in or previous completion (with a minimum grade of 'C') of Musicianship I (MUSIC 217-1) is required.

This course is the first in a sequence of four intended for music majors who plan to earn a music certificate, degree, and/or transfer to a four-year music program. It presents techniques for vocal and keyboard sight reading, improvisation, and melodic and harmonic dictation of music featuring the concepts presented in its counterpart music theory course. Thus, Thus, concurrent enrollment in or previous successful completion (with a minimum grade of 'C') of Music Theory I (MUSIC 216-1) is required.

This course is the second in the sequence of four intended for music majors who plan to earn a music certificate, degree, and/or transfer to a four-year music program. It presents the principles of contrapuntal expansion of tonality. topics will include the elaboration and reduction of tonic, pre-dominant and dominant harmonies, and phrase structure. The practical application of these topics will be addressed in the corresponding musicianship course. Thus, concurrent enrollment in or previous completion (with a minimum grade of 'C') of Musicianship II (MUSIC 217-2) is required.

This course is the second in a sequence of four intended for music majors who plan to earn a music certificate, degree, and/or transfer to a four-year music program. It presents techniques for vocal and keyboard sight reading, improvisation, and melodic and harmonic dictation of music featuring the concepts presented in its counterpart music theory course. Thus, Thus, concurrent enrollment in or previous successful completion (with a minimum grade of 'C') of Music Theory II (MUSIC 216-2) is required.

This course is the second in the sequence of four intended for music majors who plan to earn a music certificate, degree, and/or transfer to a four-year music program. It presents the principles of chromatic expansion of tonality and an introduction to musical form. Topics will include harmonic sequences, applied chords, modulation, binary form, modal mixture, Neapolitan chords, augmented sixth chords and period structure. The practical application of these topics will be addressed in the corresponding musicianship course. Thus, concurrent enrollment in or previous completion (with a minimum grade of 'C') of Musicianship III (MUSIC 217-3) is required.

This course is the second in a sequence of four intended for music majors who plan to earn a music certificate, degree, and/or transfer to a four-year music program. It presents techniques for vocal and keyboard sight reading, improvisation, and melodic and harmonic dictation of music featuring the concepts presented in its counterpart music theory course. Thus, Thus, concurrent enrollment in or previous successful completion (with a minimum grade of 'C') of Music Theory III (MUSIC 216-3) is required.

This course is the last in a sequence of four intended for music majors who plan to earn a music certificate, degree, and/or transfer to a four-year music program. It presents a survey of the principles of musical form used in a variety of styles from the late-nineteenth century on, including folk, classical, jazz, and popular music. Topics will include single-movement forms (binary, ternary, rondo and sonata), folk and popular song forms, extended terian harmonies, modality, blues harmony, non-diatonic collections, post-tonal techniques, and non-pitch-related structures. The practical application of these topics will be addressed in the corresponding musicianship course. Thus, concurrent enrollment in or previous completion (with a minimum grade of 'C') of Musicianship IV (MUSIC 217-4) is required.

This course is the second in a sequence of four intended for music majors who plan to earn a music certificate, degree, and/or transfer to a four-year music program. It presents techniques for vocal and keyboard sight reading, improvisation, and melodic and harmonic dictation of music featuring the concepts presented in its counterpart music theory course. Thus, Thus, concurrent enrollment in or previous successful completion (with a minimum grade of 'C') of Music Theory IV (MUSIC 216-4) is required.

See Dr. Daniel Keller's site for more information

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